Top 5 power families that control the world

FORUMS 🐝 LIFESTYLE People Top 5 power families that control the world

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    Nicol Nwanua
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    1. The Rockafella family wealth is said to be from John D Rockafella. The family is said to be worth around $1and3 trillion.

    They are an American family that controls American oil refinery which made him the country’s first billionaire. He and his son John Jr. later turned to philanthropy and contributed over $1 billion which Includes founding of the University of Chicago and Rockefeller University founded by John Jr. Rockefeller Center in Midtown Manhattan.

    Today the estate is divided between 174 people. John D’s only grandson, David, with a long heirscareer at Chase National Bank, was the oldest billionaire in the world at the age of 101.

    2. The Saud family:

    The British Royal Family’s wealth is estimated at $ 88 billion, according to business consulting Brand Finance. However, this monarchy is far from the richest royal family in the world.

    This difference may go to the Saud House, the ruling royal family of Saudi Arabia. Saud’s home, which consists of 15,000 family members (although most of the wealth is in the hands of only about 2,000 of them), is estimated at $ 1.4 trillion. In comparison, the British Royal Family has almost 16 times the assets.

    Like their British counterpart, members of the Saudi royal family were deprived of their wealth. But know-how suggests an enviable lifestyle full of cost, private jets, luxury yachts, high-end helicopters, sparkling castles and a beautiful property adorned with gold utensils, including a gilded Kleenex dispenser.

    However, family members also donate money to those in need through charities and investing in the Saudi people. Recently, the country pledged millions of funds to the World Bank for women entrepreneurs. Their wealth comes from many oil reserves discovered more than 75 years ago, during the reign of King Abdulaziz ibn Saud Saudi Aramco, a state-owned natural gas and oil company, is estimated to be over $ 2 trillion for some. If this estimate is correct, it could be one of the most profitable oil companies in the world.

    They are known to control 20% of the global oil reserves.

    3. The Rothschild family

    It was an 18th-century Jewish court that lived in what was once known as the Free City of Frankfurt (now Frankfurt, Germany) as a personal bank with German royalty and dignitaries. In the 19th century, the family owned the most private property in the world, also the most in the history of the modern world.

    Think “the wealthiest in the world” holding on today, and some familiar names like Microsoft’s Bill Gates or Zara’s Amancio Ortega may be suggested in their place. In fact, it’s hard to find a “Rothschild” when you scroll through all the 500 richest people in the world at Forbes. But the family’s wealth is spread over generations and countless for the heirs, leaving little behind them all. That said, the general consensus is that the Rothschild family will continue to invest a conservative estimate of $ 350 billion. Some even think they are worth trillions.

    Due to their more private nature, the scale of their businesses and their countless assets, it is nearly impossible to make an accurate estimate of the true value of the family. Among the wealthiest Rothschilds we know of were Jacob Rothschild and Sir Evelyn De Rothschild, each worth around $ 50 billion and $ 20 billion.

    4. The Windsor family

    The Windsor wealth comes from the treasury and is funded by taxpayers, according to the BBC.

    The basic understanding is that the Queen will accept the return of all proceeds from the Crown Estate – the large family portfolio – to the government as payment. Each year, the Queen receives an amount equal to 25% of Crown Estate’s income.

    It was estimated at $ 107.1 million (£ 82.2 million) in 2019, the Wall Street Journal reported. The Sovereign Grant pays for family travel, palace maintenance and equipment and salaries of the royal staff, according to the family’s official financial reports. But The Telegraph says the donation doesn’t include the cost of royal security and ceremonies – that money is coming from a few other places.

    Queen’s private income is called Private walley. This money comes from the Duchy of Lancaster, a portfolio of land and other possessions that belonged to the royal family for hundreds of years. It includes $ 715 million (£ 548.6 million) in wealth (including 18,433 acres of land) and includes residential, commercial and agricultural real estate, according to Max Colchester, a correspondent for the Wall Street Journal in UK.

    According to The Journal, it will make $ 27 million (£ 20.7 million) in 2019. According to the Royal Family website, this amount will help cover costs not covered by the sovereign grant – that is, it will be used to pay “expenses incurred by other members of the royal family.” Their net worth is estimated at $88 billion

    5. The Murdoch family

    Rupert Murdoch, the patriarch of the family, inherited an Australian newspaper chain from his father, who was a war correspondent and editor in 1952. Murdoch was 22 at the time and had just graduated from Oxford University.

    He included scandalous stories in his newspaper that they helped sell. Initial success allowed it to expand rapidly. He founded Australia’s first national newspaper The Australian in 1964. In 1970 he bought headlines such as News of the World in the UK and The Sun. He founded Fox News in 1996.

    In 2018, The New York Times wrote that Murdoch developed the empire as quickly as possible “in part by relentlessly using his platform to select his favorite candidates and then relentlessly using those candidates to expand his reach.”

    When Murdoch first entered the media market, part of his strategy was to post content that was noticeable to others, perhaps even more prominent in the form of cloaked women on the third page of The Sun. Several years later, his take on the British newspaper was embroiled in a major answering machine hacking scandal, which earned him the nickname “dirty digs” from the satirically portrayed “Private Eye”.

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